Job Seekers Agreement Definition

The present case will enable the Court to develop its case-law on social benefits linked to jobseekers. This area, the case-law and legislation, which have continued to evolve since Collins,(7) still need to be clarified by the Court of Justice, in particular as regards the existence of a link between the jobseeker and the host State, a delicate issue which justifies the presentation of these conclusions. (Freedom of movement for workers – Aid to young people seeking a first job – Right to benefits for jobseekers – Grant of benefits linked to at least six years of study in the host Member State – Indirect discrimination – proportionality) In the present case, Article 36(1)(2) of the Royal Decree of 25 November 1991, in particular, point (j) provides that the right to a transitional allowance is subject to the prior obtaining of studies of at least oin six years in an educational institution managed, approved or subsidized by a community. This condition also applies to jobseekers who have completed their studies in another Member State but whose qualifications have been recognised in Belgium, as is the case for Ms Prete. As regards the legitimate objectives pursued by the States, the Court emphasised in that judgment the existence of `a link between the recipients of such an allowance and their labour market [that of the host Member State]`. (27) Consequently, the case-law allows a host Member State to require jobseekers from other Member States to prove their degree of integration. It may be the integration between the jobseeker and the labour market, but it can also be the link between the jobseeker and the host society, whether through the existence of family or emotional ties with the nationals of the host Member State or through a longer period of stay. Therefore, given that it is established that the expert report at issue must be assessed solely on the basis of the parameter of the Treaty, it should be recalled that Article 39(2) EC provides for the elimination of all discrimination based on nationality between workers of the Member States in matters of employment, remuneration and other terms and conditions of employment. Of course, this prohibition also applies to jobseekers and applies to both direct and indirect discrimination on grounds of nationality. (17) Since Collins, in which the Court departed from its previous case-law, this provision has also prohibited any form of discrimination in access to benefits intended to facilitate access to the labour market. Finally, a six-year prior application for jobseekers is a very long period, which is even longer than that required for inactive people, which is obviously five years.

(28) The Court has confirmed this temporal link in the case of students, but has also pointed out that this is a condition which applies only to persons who do not carry out an economic activity. (29) In 1995 the House of Commons passed legislation entitled the JobSeekers Act 1995. [10] [11] The 1995 Act introduced the concept of job search to describe a new benefit. The 1996 Regulation on Unemployment Benefits (S1 1996/207) was drawn up within six months of the entry into force of the Act, with the amendment of the income allowance for assistance to jobseekers having taken place on 7 October 1996. [12] Previously, on 11 September 1996, the regulations on social security (loans and contributions) (successive and other amendments of jobseekers) were created, which were submitted to Parliament five days later and the policy also entered into force on 7 October. [13] [14] The decision that serves as a reference point in this regard is, as I have already said, collins` judgment. . . .